Crate of Curios part 32

T-shirt weather is finally here, the Sahara dust has subsided and we are enjoying the wonderful Mediterranean blue skies again. Next week just might herald the end of movement restrictions and I’ve had a coffee in my usual corner cafe again. According to any parameters, life is good. So, without any further ado, let’s get to opening this week’s Crate.

  1. We hear a lot about the ‘richest people of the world’, ‘the Fortune 100 list’, etc, so it can be easy to forget that incredible wealth is not something unique to our era. In fact, on the list of 10 wealthiest individuals of all time, the 20th century is represented by a single person – and that’s not Jeff Bezos. The richest person in history is in fact estimated to be a 14th century African ruler Mansa Musa who ruled over the empire of Mali.

2. Adding the word ‘forced’ to any other word normally makes it worse. Forced empathy, however, might make you a much better negotiator.

3. Ever wondered what the students actually do at the universities? In LOLmythesis, the graduates explain their thesis topics and results in a single (often hilarious) sentence.

4. We tend to connect the British Isles with a constant drizzle and grey gloom rather than with palm trees and laid-back lifestyle. The British Isles, however, are composed of a good number of isles, among them the Isles Of Scilly, just off the coast of Cornwall, that enjoy an almost subtropical climate due to the influence of the Gulf Stream. And just so you don’t think it’s an innocent little place – The Isles of Scilly ended their 335 Year War with the Netherlands only in 1986.

5. If you are not familiar with the cartoonist The Oatmeal, it’s high time you made the acquaintance. And what better way to do it than with the story imagining his dogs as a pair of middle-aged men instead.

6. And to finish off for this week, another wonderful little comic by Grant Snider.

And that’s it for this time. Happy reading and until next week!

_________________________________________________________________________

If you want to receive the Crate to your mailbox, you can subscribe here at Substack.
The Crate is now also available on Medium.

Crate of Curios part 31

A hot Easter Sunday filled with Sahara dust has passed and today, Easter Monday, promises the opening of cafes and restaurants – albeit without music -as another step towards reclaiming our pre-pandemic life. If anything, the last six months has shown how much the little pleasures in life actually count. Hence, selfishly counting this newsletter among one of said little pleasures of life, let’s get to opening this week’s Crate without further ado.

  1. Naive art provided much of the inspiration behind modernism – one need only to name the quiet tax collector Henri Rousseau – but it does not only belong to the beginning of last century. One example of it would be a former Soviet factory worker Rosa Zharkikh, who after a near-death experience at the age of 46, started her path as an artist trying to map her visions with needle and thread into intricate embroideries.

2. No matter where, we are evaluated on our output. However, as Austin Kleon (who, by the way was the main inspiration behind this very newsletter) notes in his blog – our output depends on our input.

3. Women in Ancient Greek society have been thought to have been confined to the gynaeceum and busied themselves mostly with everyday household matters – and certainly not with anything that had to do with creation. Now, however, a shift in patterns on Greek amphoras during the Early Iron Age has called that view into question.

4. After having collectively lived through it, many of us are probably prone to classifying 2020 as the worst year ever. However, things could get much much worse – as they did in 536 A.D, supposedly the worst year in the whole European history.

5. Glass is something we mostly do not connect with sensuality, but after seeing Amber Cowan’s detail-rich works, we might just change our minds about that.

6. And to finish off for this week, a little comic from Safely Endangered.

And that’s it for this time. Happy reading and until next week!

_______________________________________________________________

If you want to receive the Crate to your mailbox, you can subscribe here at Substack.
The Crate is now also available on Medium.

Crate of Curios part 30

Moody April is coming to an end, which in this case is festive as it happens to be the Orthodox Easter. Lockdown measures are slowly beginning to be relaxed and the week after the next will hopefully see us sipping coffee in outdoors cafes instead of from takeaway cups on park benches. Until then we’ll enjoy the 20+C weather and the socially distanced celebrations of the Great Week – and of course, this week’s Crate of Curios, that I’ll proceed to open right away.

  1. Masks have been all the rage for the last one and half years, but let’s not forget that masks have been around for much longer and for much more varied reasons than health. Empress Elisabeth of Austria (more widely known as Sissi) wore an elaborate mourning mask after the scandalous death of her son Crown Prince Rudolph. A multi-faceted monarch with a tragic life story, Sissi was one of the earliest collectors of photographs (at the time when the technique was still at its infancy), she had an anchor tattoo on her shoulder and her character in the Hollywood movie trilogy mapped out actress Romy Schneider’s film career.

2. When we think of slums, we tend to think of Charles Dickens novels and Victorian apple-cheeked urchins, but the days of decrepit living quarters are much-much closer – these photos of Liverpool and other Northern cities were taken by Nick Hedges nearly a decade after the Beatles had their first hit single in the UK in 1962.

3. Expressionism and avant-garde had a hard time behind the iron curtain during the Cold War – Gyorgy Kovasznai‘s story is unfortunately not unique. His work, however, is.

4. Human emotions can be classified in different ways, but these feeling wheels based on the six basic emotions are a visually brilliant way of presenting the variety.

5. If, like me, you enjoy having something to listen to in the background while working or doing chores, History Cache is a wonderful narrative history podcast that’ll keep you well-entertained. However, forget about the work of chores when you get to the five-part series about blues musician Leadbelly or Shackleton’s voyage to cross Antarctica on foot – you won’t get anything done anyway.

6. And to finish off for this time, a little very relatable comic from Hannah Hillam.

And that’s it for this time. Happy reading and until next week!

_________________________________________________________________________

If you want to receive the Crate to your mailbox, you can subscribe here at Substack.
The Crate is now also available on Medium.

Crate of Curios part 29

The ubiquitous Sahara dust has made the last few days rather hazy and probably rather unbearable for anyone prone to allergies, but soon enough we should be out of the dust cloud and heading into the spotless blue skies territory again. People are out regardless and there is impatience in the air about knowing whether it would be allowed for people to visit their families in other municipalities for Easter. So in order to distract ourselves during the waiting time, let’s open this week’s Crate without further ado.

  1. The original romantic Bohemian artists – the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood were famous for their devotion to red-headed model-muses. The most famous of them was the tragically short-lived Elizabeth Siddall, who like Kate Moss in 1990’s helped to redefine the governing beauty standards of the 1850’s and in her case make willowy figures and copper hair into desirable assets (which they hadn’t been thus far). (The photo is thought to be Siddall, but unconfirmed.)

2. Forced to read business jargon on a regular basis? Here’s a delightful website that helps to turn it back into regular language.

3. Vegetarianism as a conscious approach to eating (as opposed to a practical reality of not being able to afford meat) has been around for a rather long time and followed a pattern of ebb and flow. It’s most recent flow started mid-19th century, where meat-free diets were seen as a part of temperance movement.

4. Why do we tend to think that fixing something automatically means adding something when subtracting is an equally valid choice? Apparently it’s complicated.

5. Down in the dumps? Lacking inspiration? Mystified by adulting? Worry not, Zen Pencils has got you covered with the most excellent comics about historical creators and their trials and tribulations.

6. And to finish off for today, here’s a handy guide to waterbodies of knowledge by Tom Gauld.

And that was it for this time. Happy reading and until next week!

__________________________________________________

If you want to receive the Crate to your mailbox, you can subscribe here at Substack.
The Crate is now also available on Medium.

Crate of Curios part 28

Another beautiful blooming Sunday, slightly chilly, albeit the cold-resistant people are already out in shorts and short sleeves. Jewelry sellers were out in Thiseio, people taking Sunday walks and queuing in the coffee shops to get their takeaways, so except for the still-ubiquitous masks life felt almost… normal. As the Sufi poet said – “This too shall pass”. The same, however, goes for this evening hour and as I need to get up early tomorrow, let’s get to opening this week’s Crate without further ado.

  1. We like to pooh-pooh selfies as a modern malady that our forebearers supposedly were blessedly free from. As it shows, what kept them from plastering their visages everywhere was rather a lack of finances, proven by the Countess da Castiglione, a famous socialite of 19th century, who bankrupted herself paying for her over 700 portrait photos.

2. Why do we consider people with a negative outlook more intelligent than their counterparts with a sunnier disposition? There are a few theories about that.

3. The English language has a funny feature – it uses a number of animal names as verbs. Not all of those verbs do justice to the creature in question.

4. The feel-good feline for this week is Smol Paul, the wobbly tuxedo kitten (by now more of a cat though), living his best life and getting up to shenanigans in Holly’s Home for Manky Moggies. (Paul is wobbly due to cerebellar hypoplasia, a type of inborn brain damage to the part of the brain that controls motor impulses.)

5. Ever wondered how low we can go in Europe in terms of temperature? Find all the answers on this map.

6. And to finish off for this week – a little comic from Nathan W. Pyle for the introverts among us.

And that’s it for this time. Happy reading and until next week!

_____________________________________________________________________

If you want to receive the Crate to your mailbox, you can subscribe here at Substack.
The Crate is now also available on Medium.

Crate of Curios part 27

April is here and Athens is in full bloom in a whole gamut of colours, starting with the violet of jacaranda to the dainty white of the fragrant nerantzi flowers. The lockdown-weary Athenians are finally embracing the city parks that pre-pandemic were mostly treated as a poor substitute to their village houses and it’s a joy to see a mix of families, couples, teenagers, Greeks, immigrants, babies, dogs, bicycles, skateboards occupying the plentiful benches. However, as it’s already a couple of hours into Monday, let’s get to opening this week’s Crate without further ado.

  1. Local mythology can be a source of great glory or unimaginable nightmares and Northern American mythology is no exception with creatures like Wendigo, Jersey Devil and Bigfoot to show. (Illustration by Monkey-Paw)

2. Overpopulation of pre-World War 1 Europe found its new home in the US, Canada and Australia – the overpopulation of Japan from the same period found its new home in… Brazil.

3. Do you know what does a fox say? No? In that case let Finnegan Fox from SaveAFox Rescue enlighten you in this delightful matter.

4. The humble potato has acquired a slightly dull reputation in Europe, but one has only look a bit further – in this case all the way to Peru – in order to see that it’s nothing but. They even have a kind with a menacing name of pusi qhachun wachachi or “make your daughter-in-law cry”.

5. This week’s poetry spamming is from the pen of the Portuguese poet Fernando Pessoa and the year 1934.

6. And this time I’ll finish off with a word instead of a comic.

And that’s it for this time. Happy reading and until next week!

________________________________________________________________________________

If you want to receive the Crate to your mailbox, you can subscribe here at Substack.
The Crate is now also available on Medium.

Crate of Curios part 26

Lockdown lasts, but since yesterday night we’ve been granted an extra hour of daylight to enjoy and luckily spring added a gorgeous sunshine to it today. Athenians are out to walk and have their obligatory coffees, showing that some customs are just too ingrained to fade even at the face of hindrances and life goes on, simply and enjoyably in its small moments. And with this little reflection, let’s proceed without further ado to opening this week’s Crate.

  1. In case you haven’t yet heard about Afrofuturism – the branch of science fiction that has given us a number of gems including, but not limited to the movie “Black Panther”, the funkadelic tunes of George Clinton and the Parliament and the novels of Octavia Butler, it about time you did. The term itself dates from 1993, but the works covered by it go back considerably longer. And as a word of note – Afrofuturism is also strongly present in contemporary African design.

2. We might consider “The Bionic Man” purely an old fantasy series, but real life is approaching the concept fast. In 2020 Robert “Buz” Chmielewski became the first person to have electrodes implanted into his brain that will allow him to control a pair of prosthetic arms with his mind only.

3. The meaning of life is, as we all know, 42. However, just in case you need some help in reaching that conclusion, Mark Manson has listed 7 questions that will help you closer to the answer. (Yes, the image is from Monty Python’s “The Meaning of Life”)

4. Having a bad day? Surely a capybara in a pool with an orange on its head can fix that.

5. Sailors were some of the people who were sporting tattoos way before they became mainstream trendy. Back then those tattoos also had particular meanings. (Click on the link to see the whole chart)

6. And a little comic by Hannah Hillam describing a typical post-pandemic condition to finish off for today.

And that was it for this time. Happy reading and until next week!

________________________________________________________________________________

If you want to receive the Crate to your mailbox, you can subscribe here at Substack.
The Crate is now also available on Medium.

Crate of Curios part 25

Spring is definitely here with the moody weather, blossoming trees and resulting allergic sneezing that adds additional spice to the pandemic atmosphere. However, looking back now at the 1-year anniversary of the pandemic, things have improved at least to a degree – the behind-the-mask sneezes that a year ago aroused visible panic in the nearest vicinity now barely raise an eyebrow. And on this stoically optimistic note, let’s proceed to opening this week’s Crate of Curios.

1. One of the best things you can do for yourself if you happen to be a) even vaguely interested in history and/or fiction and b) using Facebook, is to check out the page of Victorians, Vile Victorians, as their morning posts are a delight to read next to your morning beverage of choice.

2. Continuing on the note of delightful things – good art is definitely one of them. And yet… there are occasions when bad art is even better. Peruse the collections of the Museum of Bad Art and you’ll see what I mean.

3. You know these foggy mystical forests of fairy tales where any number of magical creatures can pop up at any moment? At least one of those actually exists in Devon, England and it’s called Wistman’s Wood.

4. How to find out your job description based on the type of writing you do? Take the test.

5. There are admittedly different ways to read a book, but one of the most useful ways seems to be to read it as a writer.

6. And as I started this Crate with talking about the weather, it seems to be only appropriate to finish it on the same note.

And that was it for this time. Happy reading and until next week!

________________________________________________________

If you want to receive the Crate to your mailbox, you can subscribe here at Substack.
The Crate is now also available on Medium.

Crate of Curios part 24

Spring is approaching with mighty steps and the weather is typically moody, alternating between windy, sunny, and mildly chilly. I wish I could say that lockdown is finally about to end, but as everything else it’s floating in the air like the kites of Clean Monday will be tomorrow. And as technically it already is Clean Monday, let’s get to opening this week’s Crate without delay.

  1. My personal history with detective stories goes a long way back, and I remember coming across the name of Pinkerton Detective Agency in Arthur Conan Doyle’s “Valley of Fear”. However, Mr. Doyle never mentioned the agency also employing the first female detective Kate Warne, who after convincing Allan Pinkerton to hire her, went on to have a stellar career as a private investigator.

2. In some countries one can flush toilet paper. In others one really shouldn’t. And then there’s Greenland.

3. Artists and novel writers have a prevailing reputation for eccentricity, but as it seems children’s book authors are no exception.

4. Ex-communist project buildings don’t carry much of a reputation of cosiness or homeliness, yet when you’ve grown up in one, you know that there’s something there – a special atmosphere you can’t really find elsewhere.

5. There are virtue and vice, light and dark, high and low, yin and yang – and then there are the Ancient Greek concepts of sophrosyne and hubris.

6. And to finish off, a nod towards the seemingly eternal lockdown from Tom Gauld.

And that was it for this time. Happy reading and until next week!

_________________________________________________________

If you want to receive the Crate to your mailbox, you can subscribe here at Substack.
The Crate is now also available on Medium.

Crate of Curios part 23

It’s yet again a slightly chilly Sunday evening and we’re still in lockdown which now has taken inception-like features (lockdown in a lockdown in a lockdown). However, spring is approaching, days are getting warmer and bitter orange trees are getting rid of their last fruits whenever a gust of wind happens to rattle them. That’s enough for a smile. And now without further ado, let’s proceed to open this week’s Crate.

  1. It might often seem that grass is greener elsewhere, but occasionally it doesn’t hurt to remind oneself that things could also be worse. These 12 most radioactive spots on Earth are a pretty good example of that.

2. Rolling your eyes at yet another book blurb promising literary delights by a stellar author? No fear, here’s all you need to decode the jargon.

3. Most people don’t like change. Our brains in general don’t like change. So the little grey cells have come up with five different ways to resist it.

4. What do you do when you’ve been a victim of petty theft, but you happen to live in Ancient Rome where police doesn’t exist yet? You write a proper nasty curse tablet to get even.

5. The bridges on euro banknotes are fictional in order to avoid squabbles between member countries. Or at least they were fictional until a Dutch designer decided to build a replica of them all in Spijkenisse.

And that was it for this time. Happy reading and until next week!

_________________________________________________________

If you want to receive the Crate to your mailbox, you can subscribe here at Substack.
The Crate is now also available on Medium.