Crate of Curios part 28

Another beautiful blooming Sunday, slightly chilly, albeit the cold-resistant people are already out in shorts and short sleeves. Jewelry sellers were out in Thiseio, people taking Sunday walks and queuing in the coffee shops to get their takeaways, so except for the still-ubiquitous masks life felt almost… normal. As the Sufi poet said – “This too shall pass”. The same, however, goes for this evening hour and as I need to get up early tomorrow, let’s get to opening this week’s Crate without further ado.

  1. We like to pooh-pooh selfies as a modern malady that our forebearers supposedly were blessedly free from. As it shows, what kept them from plastering their visages everywhere was rather a lack of finances, proven by the Countess da Castiglione, a famous socialite of 19th century, who bankrupted herself paying for her over 700 portrait photos.

2. Why do we consider people with a negative outlook more intelligent than their counterparts with a sunnier disposition? There are a few theories about that.

3. The English language has a funny feature – it uses a number of animal names as verbs. Not all of those verbs do justice to the creature in question.

4. The feel-good feline for this week is Smol Paul, the wobbly tuxedo kitten (by now more of a cat though), living his best life and getting up to shenanigans in Holly’s Home for Manky Moggies. (Paul is wobbly due to cerebellar hypoplasia, a type of inborn brain damage to the part of the brain that controls motor impulses.)

5. Ever wondered how low we can go in Europe in terms of temperature? Find all the answers on this map.

6. And to finish off for this week – a little comic from Nathan W. Pyle for the introverts among us.

And that’s it for this time. Happy reading and until next week!

_____________________________________________________________________

If you want to receive the Crate to your mailbox, you can subscribe here at Substack.
The Crate is now also available on Medium.

Crate of Curios part 27

April is here and Athens is in full bloom in a whole gamut of colours, starting with the violet of jacaranda to the dainty white of the fragrant nerantzi flowers. The lockdown-weary Athenians are finally embracing the city parks that pre-pandemic were mostly treated as a poor substitute to their village houses and it’s a joy to see a mix of families, couples, teenagers, Greeks, immigrants, babies, dogs, bicycles, skateboards occupying the plentiful benches. However, as it’s already a couple of hours into Monday, let’s get to opening this week’s Crate without further ado.

  1. Local mythology can be a source of great glory or unimaginable nightmares and Northern American mythology is no exception with creatures like Wendigo, Jersey Devil and Bigfoot to show. (Illustration by Monkey-Paw)

2. Overpopulation of pre-World War 1 Europe found its new home in the US, Canada and Australia – the overpopulation of Japan from the same period found its new home in… Brazil.

3. Do you know what does a fox say? No? In that case let Finnegan Fox from SaveAFox Rescue enlighten you in this delightful matter.

4. The humble potato has acquired a slightly dull reputation in Europe, but one has only look a bit further – in this case all the way to Peru – in order to see that it’s nothing but. They even have a kind with a menacing name of pusi qhachun wachachi or “make your daughter-in-law cry”.

5. This week’s poetry spamming is from the pen of the Portuguese poet Fernando Pessoa and the year 1934.

6. And this time I’ll finish off with a word instead of a comic.

And that’s it for this time. Happy reading and until next week!

________________________________________________________________________________

If you want to receive the Crate to your mailbox, you can subscribe here at Substack.
The Crate is now also available on Medium.